Tag Archives: restricted substances

Restrictive substances regulatory compliance – the IPC-1754 data exchange standard

Aeroplane, Granta, Restricted Substances

 

Journeying across the pond to Ottawa, Canada, members of the Granta Design Restrictive Substances team participated in a committee meeting to discuss the IPC-1754 (“Materials Declaration Standard for Aerospace and Defense”) standard. Arising out of an initiative by the International Aerospace Environmental Group (IAEG), the IPC-1754 standard establishes requirements for material and chemical substance data exchange between suppliers and their customers for aerospace and defense, heavy equipment, and other such industries.

A ballot held at the committee meeting ended with 80% approval for the standard. Although it is now approved, the committee has accepted the standard has some technical issues that need to be addressed. This will trigger a re-ballot during the summer, which will concern areas where technical changes have been made to address comments. It is expected that the standard will be published on schedule in late October-December 2017.

Collaboration

Granta’s participation in these discussions came in part to our role as a coordinator of PLEIADES. For those unfamiliar with it, PLEIADES is a collaborative project within Clean Sky 2, the European program to enable environmental improvements in next-generation aircraft. It aims to integrate and ensure effective use of both primary and secondary data on materials, processes, and products within aerospace engineering workflows.

Within PLEIADES, Rolls-Royce acts as Topic Manager to ensure that objectives surrounding ‘Sustainable and Green Engines’ are met. Together with thinkstep, a specialist in sustainability software, Granta has the role of Project partner, and further expertise comes from the University of Stuttgart, and the University of Surrey.

The REACH Authorization List gets an update

Restricted Substances

The REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) Authorization List has been updated to include 12 new substances, bringing the total to 43 substances. REACH is a European Union regulation that addresses the production and use of chemical substances to provide a high level of protection for human health and the environment.

Its remit also includes the enhancement of innovation within the EU chemicals industry, and to promote the use of alternative assessment methods. Granta Design will be incorporating the changes to the REACH Authorisation List in the July release of its Restricted Substances Data Module, which provides the database component of the GRANTA MI:Restricted Substances package.

The GRANTA MI:Restricted Substances package enables customers to combine in-house datasets on their materials and specifications, together with high-quality datasets provided by Granta on legislations and lists, restricted substances, engineering and coating materials, and industry specifications.

Using Granta analysis tools, a company’s material and process portfolio can be risk-assessed to identify compliance and obsolescence risks, enabling effective mitigation strategies to be put in place. Using Granta’s CAD and PLM integration tools, minimal risk and compliance can be ensured in new design, while other tools enable companies to risk-assess and produce compliance reports on legacy products.

The oversight and development of this package is in collaboration with the Environmental Materials Information Technology (EMIT) Consortium who have recently announced their latest new member, Bombardier Aerospace.

Predicting the future of restricted substances

Predicting the future is no easy feat without the help of a time machine. Often, that’s a good thing. But, sometimes, it’s not so good – one example being with restricted substances. If these substances are included in products, the results can be expensive fines, loss of market share and stock value, and (worst of all) damage to brand reputation. Many companies are struggling even to avoid use of substances that are already regulated. But, with new substances being added to restricted lists all the time, that may not be enough. How do we avoid using substances that are likely to become unusable during the lifetime of the product?

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